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HOW THIS BOOK CAME TO BE
 
I wrote this book as one step on a long journey. 
As part of my research I found myself at Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Los Angeles. What I discovered there changed my life.
 
I saw kiosks erected on the cemetery grounds, each equipped with a screen and a keyboard. Hollywood Forever was one of the first places to offer biopics of the dead, which were then posted online.
 
Family members and friends could access these from home, or visit the cemetery and watch Uncle Bob’s biopic as they gazed at his final resting place.
 
I found this fascinating, but I speculated that this experiment could use AI (artificial intelligence) software to create online avatars of the dead. Computer games and businesses had been using interactive avatars for years, and there was no reason why code writers could not produce online entities that looked, talked, and gestured like the dead.
 
I forgot about these imaginings until 2013. I went online to find out whether anyone else had thought of making interactive avatars of the dead.
 
To my astonishment I found a world of the online dead at whose existence I had never guessed. My book is the story of what I found when I journeyed into that world.
 
 

INTERNET AFTERLIFE by Kevin O NeillKevin O Neill, 02 Sep 2016 20:16

10 months later this looks quite dead. Is there anyone working on this ?

no pasa nada by Rene MilanRene Milan, 24 Jan 2014 22:01

Ideally all energy should be generated locally to avoid transmission losses & costs. Generate electricity in space by all means, but move the industry it powers there as well.


Wayne Eddy
Melbourne, Australia
LGAM Knowledge Base
Contact via Google+

The idea of a Collaborative Knowledge Acquisition Process has been rattling around in my brain for quite a while.

There are parallels with:

Hopefully some one will work out a really good way of implementing a variation on this theme soon, and humanity will reap the rewards.


Wayne Eddy
Melbourne, Australia
LGAM Knowledge Base
Contact via Google+

How about asking more fundamental questions? "What platform to use?", "what functionality to emulate?" (user database, profiles, etc) kind of expect answers within currently dominating technologies. As I suggested on G+ (from different account), it may be a start (because it would be hard to invent something new and better from scratch), but what if we started with questions like "how would I like to interact?" or "what kind of interaction would be most beneficial for project X?", or even start with list of projects, those on-going and those only dreamt of, and think how to use computers for achieving the best progress possible… My point is, we're not quite there yet with realizing full potential of computer-based communication, "social networking" being just one step out of many to come. Sorry for stating the obvious :) An I guess the real question here is, what would your ideal communication device/software look like, if you could ask a good jinn for it?

Evolution by Macius SzczurMacius Szczur, 07 May 2013 17:31

Phil Bowermaster
Stephen Gordon
Eric Drexler
George Dvorsky
John von Neumann
I G Good
Michał Frąckowiak
Dean Kamen
Peter Thiel
Claude Shannon


Wayne Eddy
Melbourne, Australia
LGAM Knowledge Base
Contact via Google+

More People to Add by Wayne EddyWayne Eddy, 28 Apr 2013 12:50
Integration
Rene MilanRene Milan 23 Apr 2013 08:30
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » H+ Connect

"Lastly should the Transhumanist community be meeting in a single social network or should we be interacting in various places" - various places is what we have now, and i am sure at least some of those will want to maintain their independence. But i would like to see H+ Connect become a central network AND act as a portal to existing sites, from ieet.org to transhumanity.net, hplusmagazine.com to turingchurch.com etc. And one feature that i really want is a search facility that will allow me to find all (my own or someone else's) posts (articles or comments) across all of these sites. That will allow me to easily verify what was said when and where by whom, to refind references that i failed to bookmark the first time, and to save me the time to reformulate a thought that i have previously expressed elsewhere.

Integration by Rene MilanRene Milan, 23 Apr 2013 08:30
Platform
Wayne EddyWayne Eddy 23 Apr 2013 02:47
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » H+ Connect

Has anyone given much thought to what platform H+ Connect would be built on? Ning? Yammer? Wikidot itself has a lot of 'hidden' functionality that could be used to satisfy many of the objectives mentioned on the H+ Connect page.

Also what about Google+? There are already a few Transhumanism related communities forming there.

e.g. https://plus.google.com/u/0/?tab=wX#communities/107456712659113245536/members

Lastly should the Transhumanist community be meeting in a single social network or should we be interacting in various places, and just building up a database of the various options the community is using to keep in touch and discuss ideas?


Wayne Eddy
Melbourne, Australia
LGAM Knowledge Base
Contact via Google+

Platform by Wayne EddyWayne Eddy, 23 Apr 2013 02:47

I think a skills register would be a good thing to include as part of H+ Connect.

A skills register would be a good way of finding suitable potential team members for a project or initiative.


Wayne Eddy
Melbourne, Australia
LGAM Knowledge Base
Contact via Google+

Skills Register by Wayne EddyWayne Eddy, 23 Apr 2013 02:27

There is a standard way of dealing with requirements - not all requirements are equal. The following words are used 'Must', 'Shall', Should' and 'May'. It could be useful in cases of conflicting opinions or doubt, as time passes.

e.g.
Must refers to a Statutory/Legal requiement.
1. The Organisation must register….

Shall or Will refers to an obligatory requirement.
2. The Finance Officer will present to the Board….

Should refers to a requirement where a degree of latitude is allowed.
3. The Library should remain accessible at all hours….

Requirements status by alexander macraealexander macrae, 29 Mar 2013 11:21
leigerleiger 19 Jun 2011 02:37
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » Transhumanism

… or just remove it completely! xD


Shane Smith
Web Developer and Wikidot Community Administrator
Links: Blog, Wikimated, Editor (STE), Documentation

by leigerleiger, 19 Jun 2011 02:37

Wayne Eddy: Perhaps the true singularity is the point in time when we know all the useful things there is to know?

Timothy Foster: Therefore, it is logical to say that we can neither know everything that is useful, either. For, if we cannot know everything, then how can we know that we've reached a point where we've learned everything useful? There would always be more to learn, and we cannot know whether or not that new information can be usefully applied.

Good point!

Only when we know everything, can we possibly make the decision that we know everything that is useful.

Because if we don't know everything… then there's no way to say for sure that the things that are unknown to us are not useful.

Hard to explain & had to re-read that paragraph a few times before I understood what you are saying. But put simply, it basically means that we will never stop searching for answers, because we'll never reach that point in time that Wayne mentioned.


Shane Smith
Web Developer and Wikidot Community Administrator
Links: Blog, Wikimated, Editor (STE), Documentation

Re: Exponential or S-curve? by leigerleiger, 18 Jun 2011 15:07

Sounds a lot like a black hole. Entering a situation where technology grows unpredictably fast almost sounds apocalyptic.

I think, though, that people understand the consequence of being unable to control something, especially something this big. In order to keep sustainability, it would make sense that technological grown eventually peter out to a maximum, whatever that maximum may be.

Perhaps the true singularity is the point in time when we know all the useful things there is to know?

That seems like a true statement. It seems to be one of the joys of humanity to learn and explore, and if we reach a point where there is nothing else to learn, then, well, it just seems bland. Existence almost seems to become a plague rather than an adventure.

But fortunately, I don't think we'll ever reach that point. Firstly, I don't think we can ever learn everything since God designed the Universe in such a way that we cannot possibly understand it all. Only He has the authority and power to know everything about His creation and beyond.

Therefore, it is logical to say that we can neither know everything that is useful, either. For, if we cannot know everything, then how can we know that we've reached a point where we've learned everything useful? There would always be more to learn, and we cannot know whether or not that new information can be usefully applied.

How much of what there is to know do we already know?

One of the amazing things is understanding how much we don't know. Understanding that, we can see just how amazing God's creation is and therefore see just how amazing God Himself is.

When will we transition to a post-scarcity civilization"?

I don't know if we can ever reach that point. Going to the beginning, it isn't unreasonable to say that people lived in a post-scarcity society. There wasn't a lot of people, and there was an abundance of material. But because of the nature of humanity, money was invented to moderate society. There will always be corruption and people who want to abuse the system, and to ensure that doesn't happen, scarcity is an unfortunate consequence.

Of course, I suppose Heaven would be post-scarcity ;)


Timothy Foster - @tfAuroratide
Auroratide.com - Go here if you're nerdy like me

As a Christian, I believe that we will never know everything - but we will continue learning and broadening our knowledge.

There is an "upper limit" of being able to "know everything", and God has achieved that - he created 'everything', so he understands how it all works.

How much of what there is to know do we already know?

Probably 0.000001%

When will we transition to a post-scarcity civilization"?

To me, "post-scarcity" isn't defined particularly well1. In a really broad sense, it could be applied to communism (share wealth with everyone, regardless of how difficult your job is) or even ancient civilisations where money didn't exist (trade/barter farming produce, but other than that it's all "free" & information/news is discussed freely).

In the future, to achieve a post-scarcity civilisation, there needs to be a few prerequisites. Giving things away for free can only be achieved if:

  • The cost of producing those things (e.g. news/information) is free
  • Or, the people that produce those things are willing to shoulder the costs that they involve and still give it away for free

Shane Smith
Web Developer and Wikidot Community Administrator
Links: Blog, Wikimated, Editor (STE), Documentation

Re: Exponential or S-curve? by leigerleiger, 18 Jun 2011 09:54

I suspect that there is only a limited amount of knowledge about how the universe works that can be discovered, and therefore that technological growth has an upper limit.
Perhaps the true singularity is the point in time when we know all the useful things there is to know?

Instead of asking if & when a technological singularity will occur, perhaps we should be asking different questions, like;

  • How much of what there is to know do we already know?
  • When will we transition to a post-scarcity civilization"?

Wayne Eddy
Melbourne, Australia
LGAM Knowledge Base
Contact via Google+

Exponential or S-curve? by Wayne EddyWayne Eddy, 13 Jun 2011 01:29
leigerleiger 07 Jun 2011 13:35
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » Transhumanism

I have no idea what the map means or why it is there. Maybe you should explain this on the page?

Cheers,
Shane


Shane Smith
Web Developer and Wikidot Community Administrator
Links: Blog, Wikimated, Editor (STE), Documentation

by leigerleiger, 07 Jun 2011 13:35
leigerleiger 02 Jun 2011 05:47
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » Carbon Dioxide Scrubber

Oh, the writers were certainly planning a third season and had plenty of ideas for it from what I've heard… but Syfy channel decided to pull the plug on funding, and as they are the single biggest investor in the Stargate franchise that means it's impossible for them to go ahead.

Not sure about the second season, but for the first season of SGU, each episode reportedly cost $ 3 million to produce. In part due to actors like Robert Carlyle, and also due to the amount of money they pumped into special effects.


Shane Smith
Web Developer and Wikidot Community Administrator
Links: Blog, Wikimated, Editor (STE), Documentation

by leigerleiger, 02 Jun 2011 05:47

Stargate Universe is my favourite new SF series in quite a while. It seems a lot more mature & realistic than SG1 or Atlantis, and heaps better than any of the Star Trek series. Sounds like they aren't planning a third series though, so that's disappointing.


Wayne Eddy
Melbourne, Australia
LGAM Knowledge Base
Contact via Google+

by Wayne EddyWayne Eddy, 02 Jun 2011 04:58

I can't find a suitable place on the forums to mention this, so I put it here (as in "I suggest reading the magazine"). It's the closest thing to being relevant I could find.

Basically, I bought a recent issue of the magazine and it seems to mention quite a few interesting developments in the science and technology fields.

Whilst it's interesting to read, the magazine is fairly small … so I'm wondering if anyone has subscribed to it? I'm not sure if it's worth getting a subscription for myself yet.


Shane Smith
Web Developer and Wikidot Community Administrator
Links: Blog, Wikimated, Editor (STE), Documentation

"New Scientist" magazine by leigerleiger, 11 May 2011 05:30
leigerleiger 07 Apr 2011 03:34
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » Carbon Dioxide Scrubber

The first three episodes of hit sci-fi TV show Stargate Universe (including the pilot) are titled "Air" (Part 1-3) - it centres around introducing the cast of the new show, and how they got into their current predicament… as well as a new problem: million-year-old CO2 scrubbers are failing and they need to find a way to get them operational again before they run out of breathable air.

In fact, the first 8-9 episodes are mostly about collecting resources (and introducing character back-story), and it's not until after those eps that we begin to see some real, action-packed space battles :) Stunning sci-fi visual effects rock!


Shane Smith
Web Developer and Wikidot Community Administrator
Links: Blog, Wikimated, Editor (STE), Documentation

by leigerleiger, 07 Apr 2011 03:34
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